How to Keep a Crushing Site Safe

Jul. 18, 2018

On a crushing site, there is nothing more important than safety.

Yet, too often, safety is preached more intensely than it’s practiced. Falling into that trap is dangerous. It’s a commitment that requires dedicated attention, day-in and day-out.

Although efficiency and quality of production are vitally important, without a strict focus on safety crushing sites can’t function – and worse, people will get hurt.

To prevent that happening, here’s how you can keep a crushing site safe.

Focus on Comprehensive Training

Training must be a top priority. At the end of the day, on-site employees are the key to safety on a crushing site. They’re the ones operating machines, implementing procedures, and navigating the logistics of the site each day. Ultimately, they’re the people at risk if something does go wrong.

Training can ensure that employees are prepared to stay safe. It’s less likely that something goes wrong if employees have been given the proper training to safely perform their jobs.

MSHA (Mine Safety and Health Administration) 48(b) training is the beginning of adequately preparing on-site employees to practice safe techniques.

Called New Miner training, this curriculum provides a fundamental baseline of industry safety knowledge, including information around:

  • Accident Prevention
  • Conveyor Safety
  • Electrical Hazards
  • Equipment/Machine Guarding
  • Escape and Emergency Evacuation Procedures
  • Fire Warning and Firefighting
  • First Aid
  • Hazard Recognition
  • Hazard Communication
  • Health (Dust and Noise)
  • Job Safety Analysis

...And much more

The 48(b) training establishes a solid base of knowledge. And that’s important – at Mellot, we do foundational training annually. However, we also go above and beyond MSHA training.

We do daily safety briefings to keep the subject top of mind. We hold weekly trainings around site-specific tasks and proactive training around new safety features. Our goal is to thoroughly equip our teams to be fully aware of safety practices.

A comprehensive training approach means greater safety.

Focus on Procedures and Inspections

Training provides the base of knowledge that’s absolutely necessary for safety adherence. This basic knowledge will be useless if it’s not put into practice.

In the case of crushing site safety, practice happens through procedures and inspections.

Safety Procedures

Sometimes, safety procedures can be simple common sense. For instance, applying sunscreen and staying hydrated while working outside during summer months may seem like minor considerations, but heat exhaustion can lead to major accidents – so paying attention to even seemingly minor, routine procedures is important.

Adhering to PPE (personal protective equipment) procedures is important too. At Mellott, we ensure that our teams go beyond MSHA regulation by wearing PPE anywhere on-site, period.

Maintaining clean equipment is another important safety consideration. Accidents can result from dirty mirrors or poor visibility.

Replacing equipment at appropriate rates can help to avoid breakdowns and accidents. At Mellott, we tag out equipment before levels of wear reach MSHA standards. 

Inspections

Inspections are the means through which procedures are enforced.

On Mellott sites, we perform workplace exams to check that areas of the crushing site are cleared to function safely. This includes roadways, the pit area, conveyors, crushers, screens, etc. Pre-shift exams are also performed on all mobile equipment. If worn equipment is found, it is repaired or replaced.

In the end, proper procedures and inspections greatly reduce the risk of site accidents.

Maintain a Focused Mindset

Finally, the underlying key to safety success is consistently maintaining a focus on it. 

Again, that may sound like routine advice. It is. At the same time, though, it’s important to understand – because when things are preached over and over again, human nature is to slip into complacency.

Consequently, the fight for safety is a fight against complacency. When you’ve walked a site hundreds of times, an inspection can become routine. When you’ve performed the same task each day for months, it’s easy to stop noticing details. When you do something over and over, you get complacent.

Complacency cannot happen. If it does, accidents will happen.

Trainings can help. Fresh eyes on inspections can help. Daily reminders to the team can help. Everything should be done in an effort to kill complacency and banish the thought that “an accident won’t happen to me. 

To stay as safe as possible at a crushing site, strive to stay focused on safety.

Stay Safe on the Crushing Site

Accidents happen – but with proper focus on safety, you can reduce the likelihood that they happen on your crushing site.

To stay safe, focus on providing comprehensive training, implementing safe procedures and inspections, and fighting a mindset of complacency. 

And, for assistance with crushing site safety, we’re here to help. Whether you’re seeking replacement equipment parts or safety consulting, we can work to ensure that you have the resources you need.

Get in touch with us. And, most importantly, be sure to stay safe.

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